Help all Australians feel valued and give people the opportunity to participate fully in society buy viagra australia online One of the best ways to see Australia – the east coast, the west coast, or the whole country – is on a self-drive road trip in your own campervan.

Campus Security Report


Background

This Pacific Institute of Technology (PIT) Security Report was published in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistic Act (“Clery Act”). This information is being provided as part of PIT’s commitment to safety and security on campus. At PIT the safety and well-being of students, faculty, and staff is important. A truly safe campus can only be achieved through the cooperation of everyone at PIT. We hope that this information will foster a safe environment for everyone at PIT. This report was prepared in cooperation with the Morrow Police Department and City Hall of Morrow, Georgia. These entities provided updated information to comply with the Act.

The full text of this report can be located on our website www.pacifictech.edu and each year an electronic e-mail announcement is sent to all enrolled students. Copies of the report may also be obtained from any PIT employee. All prospective employees may obtain a copy from the Human Resources Office.

During orientation students are informed of security procedures and information is presented to new employees. A common theme of all awareness and crime prevention programs is to encourage students and employees to be aware of their responsibility for their own security and the security of others.

Reporting of Criminal Activities or Emergencies

The Morrow Police Department is responsible for law enforcement, security and emergency response at PIT. All crimes occurring at PIT should immediately be reported to the Morrow Police Department (MPD). The MPD patrols the campus regularly. Morrow police officers are trained to receive, document and investigate all crimes reported. Morrow Police will work with individuals reporting a crime to obtain information and evidence, identify potential witnesses, and conduct a thorough investigation in an effort to identify the responsible party. Morrow police officers have full law enforcement authority at PIT.

The Morrow Police Department has complete police authority to apprehend and arrest anyone involved in illegal acts on-campus and areas immediately adjacent to the campus. If minor offenses involving PIT rules and regulations are committed by a PIT student, the Morrow Police Department may also refer the individual to PIT’s disciplinary division. Major offenses such as rape, murder, aggravated assault, robbery, and auto theft are reported to the MPD. The Morrow police are deployed to solve these serious felony crimes. The prosecution of all criminal offenses, both felony and misdemeanor, are conducted at Municipal, General Sessions, or Federal Court of Clayton County.

There is no written memorandum of understanding between PIT and MPD.

  • 9-1-1 should be used in emergency situations only, where immediate police, fire, or medical assistance is needed. Examples of this are crimes in progress, crashes with injuries or life threatening situations.
  • All other calls such as suspicious activity or person seen in the parking lots, loitering around vehicles or inside buildings should be reported using the non-emergency number (770.961.4000).

Community members, students, faculty, staff, and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety related incidents. If assistance is required from the MPD, contact the agency immediately. Crimes should be reported to the MPD to ensure inclusion in the annual crime statistics and to aid in providing timely warning notices to the community, when appropriate. For example, a crime that was reported only to the Rape Crisis Center would not be included in the PIT crime statistics.

All reports will be investigated. PIT does not have procedures for voluntary, confidential reporting of crime statistics. Violations of the law will be referred to law enforcement agencies and when appropriate, to the PIT Administration for review. When a potentially dangerous threat to the school community arises, timely reports or warnings will be issued through e-mail announcements, the posting of flyers, in-class announcements, or other appropriate means.

PIT will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence, or a non-forcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary hearing conducted by the college against the student who is the alleged perpetrator of the crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense, PIT will provide the results of the disciplinary hearing to the victim’s next of kin, if so requested.

The Morrow Police Department encourages anyone who is the victim or witness to any crime to promptly report the incident to the police. Because police reports are public records under state law, the Morrow Police Department cannot hold reports of crime in confidence. Confidential reports of crime may also be made to Crime Stoppers at 770-781-7308.

Confidential Reporting

If you are the victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action within the criminal justice system, you may still want to consider making a confidential report. With your permission, PIT can file a report on the details of the incident without revealing your identity. The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With such information, PIT can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students; determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, assailant, and alert the campus to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crimes statistics for PIT.

Timely Reporting

PIT’s personnel work closely with local, state, and federal police agencies and have telephone capability with the MPD. PIT maintains a close working relationship with the MPD. All PIT owned or leased property in outlying areas is patrolled by the MPD. All crime victims and witnesses are strongly encouraged to immediately report the crime to the agency. Prompt reporting will assure timely warning notices on-campus and timely disclosure of crime statistics.

In the event that a situation arises, either on or off campus, that, in the judgment of the MPD, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a campus wide “timely warning” will be issued. The warning will be issued through the PIT e-mail system to students, faculty and staff. Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to a PIT employee or by phone (678-610-5900).

Clery Reportable Crime Definitions

Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter: the willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.

NOTE: Deaths caused by negligence, attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides, accidental deaths, and justifiable homicides are excluded.

Negligent Manslaughter: the killing of another person through gross negligence.

Sex Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent. If a sex offense occurs in conjunction with a murder, both crimes will be reported.

Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances in which the victim is incapable of giving consent.

Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, forcibly and/ or against that person’s will; or, not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.

Incest: Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.

Statutory Rape: Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

Robbery: the taking or attempting to take anything from value of the care, custody or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Aggravated Assault: an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife or other weapon is used which could or probably would result in a serious potential injury if the crime were successfully completed.

Burglary: The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes this definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or a felony; breaking and entering with intent to commit a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

Motor Vehicle Theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. (Classify as motor vehicle theft all cases where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access, even though the vehicles are later abandoned – including joy riding)

Arson: The willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, or personal property of another kind.

Hate Crimes: A hate or biased related crime is not a separate, distinct crime, but is the commission of a criminal offense which was motivated by the offender’s bias. For example, a subject assaults a victim, which is a crime. If the facts of the case indicate that the offender was motivated to commit the offense because of his/her bias against the victim’s race, sexual orientation, gender, religion, ethnicity, nation origin, gender identity, or disability, the assault is then also classified as a hate/bias crime.

Larceny: The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another.

Vandalism: To willfully or maliciously destroy, injure, disfigure, or deface any public or private property, real or personal, without the consent of the owner or person having custody or control by cutting, tearing, breaking, marking, painting, drawing, covering with filth, or any other such means as may be specified by local law.

Intimidation: To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.

Simple Assault: An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration or loss of consciousness.

If a hate crime occurs where there is an incident involving intimidation, vandalism, larceny, simple assault or other bodily injury, the law requires that the statistic be reported as a hate crime even though there is no requirement to report the crime classification in any other area of the compliance document.

A hate or bias related crime is not a separate, distinct crime, but is the commission of a criminal offense which was motivated by the offender’s bias. For example, a subject assaults a victim, which is a crime. If the facts of the case indicate that the offender was motivated to commit the offense because of his bias against the victim’s race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, disability, gender identity, or national origin; the assault is then also classified as a hate/bias crime and will be categorized by the bias.

Domestic Violence: A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed (1) By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim. (2) By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common. (3) By a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner. (4) By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred. (5) By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. (1) The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. (2) For the purpose of this definition, dating violence includes but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat

Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to
(1) Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or (2) Suffer substantial emotional distress. (3) For the purpose of this definition, Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveys, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property. Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling. Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim. (4) Report the location as where a perpetrator engaged in the stalking course of conduct or where a victim first became aware of the stalking. (5) Report any additional behaviors that meet the above definition of Stalking if they occur or continue to occur after an official intervention has been put in place, including, but not limited to, an institutional disciplinary action or the issuance of a no contact order, restraining order or any warning by the institution or a court.

Drug Abuse Violations: Violations of state and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include: opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine, heroin, codeine); marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs (barbiturates, Benzedrine).

Liquor Law Violations: The violation of laws or ordinance prohibiting: the manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still; furnishing liquor to minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor; drinking on a train or public conveyance; all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. (Drunkenness and driving under the influence are not included in this definition.)

NOTE: The above listed crime definitions from the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook as well as additions from 2014 VAWA Negotiated Rulemaking Final Consensus Language.

Amendments to Clery Act Definitions

1. Sexual Assault: An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI’s UCR program.

2. Sex Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent. • Rape- The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim. • Fondling – The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity. • Incest – Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law. • Statutory Rape – Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

3. Domestic Violence: A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed • By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim; • By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common; • By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; • By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; • By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

4. Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. • The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. • For the purposes of this definition, dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. • Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence. • Any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

5. Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to • Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or • Suffer substantial emotional distress. For the purposes of this definition: • Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property. • Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim. • Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling. • Any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

VAWA Amendments to Clery Act Definitions

6. Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking: Comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking that: • Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and • Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community, and societal levels Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking include both primary prevention and awareness programs directed at incoming students and new employees and ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns directed at students and employees.

7. Awareness programs: Community-wide or audience specific programming, initiatives, and strategies that increase audience knowledge and share information and resources to prevent violence, promote safety, and reduce perpetration

8. Bystander intervention: Safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking Bystander intervention includes: • Recognizing situations of potential harm • Understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking actions to intervene

9. Ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns: Programming, initiatives, and strategies that are sustained over time and focus on increasing understanding of topics relevant to and skills for addressing dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, using a range of strategies with audiences throughout the institution

10. Primary prevention programs: Programming, initiatives, and strategies informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome that are intended to stop dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking before they occur through the promotion of positive and healthy behaviors that foster healthy, mutually respectful relationships and sexuality, encourage safe bystander intervention, and seek to change behavior and social norms in healthy and safe direction.

11. Risk reduction: Options designed to decrease perpetration and bystander inaction, and to increase empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to help individuals and communities address conditions that facilitate violence.

12. Prompt, fair, and impartial proceeding: A proceeding that is completed within reasonably prompt timeframes designated by an institution’s policy, including a process that allows for the extension of timeframes for good cause and with written notice to the accuser and the accused of the delay and the reason for the delay; Conducted in a manner that: • Is consistent with the institution’s policies and transparent to the accuser and accused; • Includes timely notice of meetings at which the accuser or accused, or both, may be present; and • Provides timely and equal access to the accuser, the accused, and appropriate officials to any information that will be used during informal and formal disciplinary meetings and hearings; and • Conducted by officials who do not have a conflict of interest or bias for or against the accuser or the accused

13. Advisor: Any individual who provides the accuser or accused support, guidance, or advice